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Sandusky County Commissioners Building

The Commissioners building in Sandusky was a standing seam roofing job; but not your typical standing seam. The county commissioners worked with us to bring their vision of a shiny new roof to life, copper standing seam. After multiple trips to the job site to collect ‘before’ photos, measurements, and put together detailed drawings of the roof line we were ready to begin. Like any other job, you first have to set up your scaffold so you can easily access the roof from the ground and the ground from the roof. Each job may require different styles but with Sandusky we used Biljax Step Frames. This style of scaffold is very common in the construction industry and allows for the workers to climb the side to reach the roof and top of the scaffolding.

The next step is to begin demolition of the old shingle roof. To prevent any leaks or water damage we would set up scaffold to access an area, remove the old shingles and gutter, then lastly begin installing the new copper panels and copper gutter. We used this same routine all the way around the building. To give an idea of the size and difficulty of the building, we had 4-5 guys doing demo and panels and 2 guys working on gutters, ridges, and valleys. In the photos through this post you will notice the roof line is complex. Whereas it is not just a simple hipped or gable roof. It has multiple hips, valleys and even a conical roof. The conical may have been the most difficult roof to complete for this job. We still used standing seam panels but they had to be cut and bent at very specific angles to fit the ‘cone’ shape. Like the rest of the building, the conical has a gutter around it which again created another level of complexity. It can be tough to turn a flat rectangular piece of copper into a gutter that is then wrapped around a curve; ultimately forming a circle. Atop the completed conical is an ornate finial. This is what adds all the detail at the top so it doesn’t just look like an upside down ice cream cone. The finial has a small conical shape at the bottom where it is attached, then a rod going through the end vertically with another ornate piece attached and finally another thin rod standing tall at the top.

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